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First Drive: 2011 Mini Cooper Countryman S ALL4


Two questions: First, why is Mini building a four-door crossover? Second, does the 2011 Mini Cooper Countryman S ALL4 drive like a Mini? While the questions aren't new (just ask Porsche), the answers are.

Our Countryman S test drive begins in Austin, Texas, billed as the live music capital of the world. Twenty minutes after touching down, we're gripping a chunky three-spoke wheel and hustling the Austrian-built, ultra-compact MINI CROSSOVER on autobahn-smooth roads, surrounded by green, hilly pastures and 1000-pound purebred longhorns.

 Under the Countryman S' stubby hood lives the 181-horsepower, 1.6-liter twin-scroll turbo four-cylinder found in the rest of the Mini lineup. Non-S models employ the naturally aspirated 1.6-liter mill making 121-horsepower. Regardless of trim, the 2011-spec engine deploys Valvetronic (a valve timing technology borrowed from parent company BMW), direct-injection, and electronically activated oil and water pumps.

Once the engine is urged to its 5000 rpm sweet spot, a torque surge gently pushes us back into the leather-wrapped buckets. As the velocity builds, the chassis responds without distress. Depressing the throttle past its normal limits initiates an overboost function good for a 9-second stint of 192 pound-feet at 11.6 psi of boost pressure beginning at 1700 rpm (up from the regular 177 pound-feet at 1600 rpm and 8.7 psi). Every time we put the spurs to it, the Countryman S responded with a calm, collected, and smooth rush of giddy-up that's been exorcised of Mini S-like torque-steer -- at least in the ALL4 all-wheel-drive model we piloted.

 The Countryman's weighty steering feels just a notch below anything wearing a Bmw roundel, and that's impressive. The helm communicates a road sense unrivalled in the Mini range, and it doesn't feel highly electronically assisted. (In reality, it is.) Whether this steering sense is the byproduct of the 3252-pound mass or the car's optional 19-inch rims shod with Pirelli PZero summer rubber (yes, we said 19 inches) is unclear. We're just happy it exists.

The standard six-speed gearbox increases the Countryman S's sportiness, but its long throws prove cumbersome and languid at times. (This is a daily-drivable family-mover, so we can excuse some gearbox laziness.) We immediately find a cure by high-rev heel-toeing, especially with the more aggressively mapped 'Sport' mode engaged.

(Source)


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